New Pinhoti Trail Board established to protect and restore the famous pathway

Pinhoti Trail
Governor Kay Ivey signing the Pinhoti Trail Memorandum of understanding with representatives with the Alabama Forestry Commission (AFC), the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (ADCNR), and the USDA Forest Service (Govenor Kay Ivey’s Photos)

A new governing board has been established to protect and restore one of Alabama’s most popular and beautiful trails—the Pinhoti Trail

3 agencies working together

Pinhoti
Chris Blankenship, Commissioner of Conservation (Governor Kay Ivey Photos)

Last week, the Alabama Forestry Commission (AFC), the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (ADCNR), and the USDA Forest Service signed a Memorandum of Understanding for Shared Stewardship which allows the three agencies to work together to provide a framework for the Pinhoti National Recreation Trail.

Their goal? Ensure the Alabama section of the Pinhoti remains forever a sustainable outdoor recreation resource. 

Outside Magazine declares Pinhoti Trail the best

The Conservation Fund
Thankful for beautiful Alabama views like this. Photo via Ivan LaBianca for The Conservation Fund

“In Alabama, we recognize the vital importance of protecting our state’s natural beauty and maximizing opportunities for residents and visitors alike to get outdoors and experience it for themselves,” said Governor Ivey.

Declared by Outside Magazine one of the best hikes on Planet Earth, the 170-mile Pinhoti Trail follows along the Talladega Mountain range that includes the Talladega National Forest with the southern terminus at Flagg Mountain in Coosa County, Alabama, extending across six counties throughout east Alabama to the Georgia border. 

The development of the Alabama Pinhoti Trail began in the 1970s with a key portion in the Talladega National Forest being designated as an official National Recreation Trail in 1977.

Appalachian Trail’s missing link

Weogufka Flagg Mountain Tower
A piece of history. (Weogufka State Forest)

For years, some Alabamians have advocated that the Pinhoti should be a part of the Appalachian Trail, the world’s most famous trail. Proponents say the Appalachian Trail should officially begin at Flagg Mountain terminus and end in Maine.

Want to learn more about the Pinhoti Trail? The Bama Buzz recently featured Charles Duffey and his  experiences as  a Pinhoti Trail thru hiker.

Pat Byington
Pat Byington
Articles: 412